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Dec 25, 2012 10:45pm EST
history is and how important it is to know. [applause] >> next from the georgetown university law center in washington, d.c., a discussion on the supreme court. it's about one hour and ten minutes. >> hello, everyone. i want to welcome you to today's program, which features an all-star lineup of authors who will be discussing their most recent books on the supreme court. i am a professor here at georgetown and executive director of the supreme court institute. it's a real privilege for the supreme court institute to host this event and i would like to thank our deputy director for putting it all together. before i turn the program over to our moderator i would like to remind everyone that after the program we have a reception following in which he will get a chance to have all of your newly purchased books signed by the authors and have a word or two with the authors hopefully coming in as you can see, we have food and beverage, so please stick around after the program. with that, i would like to introduce our moderator for today's program. tony really needs no introduction at all sali w
Dec 25, 2012 7:30am EST
obamacare for her. spent and this is for my mother-in-law. we take very good care of the women. >> this corrects the history on 200 years. >> what a pleasure. keep up the great work. >> thank you so much. thank you for coming. hello. >> [inaudible] >> or he will take his job. >> there you go. [inaudible] >> how do you know kelly? >> [inaudible] >> you are here in d.c.? >> yeah, yeah. >> she is my favorite surgeon. it really nice to meet you. stay on this side. if we start a trend it will take too long. and by the way, my handwriting was a little worse because i was writing while i was taking the picture. did it come out of? >> i have no idea. >> you're going to love it. thank you. >> i have to, one for me, one for my and. -- my aunt. >> did i spell that wrong? >> no, that's perfect. >> thank you. thank you for coming. >> yeah. >> keep them moving here. >> hi, my name is john. >> nice to meet you, john. [inaudible] >> it's a timely book, that's why there's a few typos in it. your name is john? >> john. >> so why did you leave oklahoma? there's a lot of oil out there. you just ca
Dec 30, 2012 3:00pm EST
opportunity for women received greater opposition than his programs on race. congress had passed a law forbidding women to serve on fighting ships or in fighting planes. so by law women did not serve on an equal basis with men. women were also not permitted to attend service academies. at this time it was legal only to assign women to hospital or transport ships. bud understood that the culture believed women should avoid aggressive activities, but once again he took another view, and here's his view. i want to quote it. i have no problem supporting women in combat for two reasons. one, i remember well my grandmother's stories about fighting off the indians along with her husband as they crossed the plains and, two, the most vicious and cunning enemy i ever had to fight was a viet cong woman. close the quote. so in 1971 bud formed one of these wave retention groups. retention groups were these groups that he created to study problems in the navy; race relations, women in the navy, etc. and these, this wave retention group revealed general dissatisfaction with the reality that women wer
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3